PROGRESSIVE MUSIC COMPANY

AFRO-AMERICAN MUSIC INSTITUTE CELEBRATES 36 YEARS

BOYS CHOIR AFRICA SHIRTS
 
 
http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/building-today-for-tomorrow/x/267428

 Pain Relief Beyond Belief

                         http://www.komehsaessentials.com/                              

 

PITTSBURGH JAZZ

 

From Blakey to Brown, Como to Costa, Eckstine to Eldridge, Galbraith to Garner, Harris to Hines, Horne to Hyman, Jamal to Jefferson, Kelly to Klook; Mancini to Marmarosa, May to Mitchell, Negri to Nestico, Parlan to Ponder, Reed to Ruther, Strayhorn to Sullivan, Turk to Turrentine, Wade to Williams… the forthcoming publication Treasury of Pittsburgh Jazz Connections by Dr. Nelson Harrison and Dr. Ralph Proctor, Jr. will document the legacy of one of the world’s greatest jazz capitals.

 

Do you want to know who Dizzy Gillespie  idolized? Did you ever wonder who inspired Kenny Clarke and Art Blakey? Who was the pianist that mentored Monk, Bud Powell, Tad Dameron, Elmo Hope, Sarah Vaughan and Mel Torme? Who was Art Tatum’s idol and Nat Cole’s mentor? What musical quartet pioneered the concept adopted later by the Modern Jazz Quartet? Were you ever curious to know who taught saxophone to Stanley Turrentine or who taught piano to Ahmad Jamal? What community music school trained Robert McFerrin, Sr. for his history-making debut with the Metropolitan Opera? What virtually unknown pianist was a significant influence on young John Coltrane, Shirley Scott, McCoy Tyner, Bobby Timmons and Ray Bryant when he moved to Philadelphia from Pittsburgh in the 1940s?  Would you be surprised to know that Erroll Garner attended classes at the Julliard School of Music in New York and was at the top of his class in writing and arranging proficiency?

 

Some answers  can be gleaned from the postings on the Pittsburgh Jazz Network.

 

For almost 100 years the Pittsburgh region has been a metacenter of jazz originality that is second to no other in the history of jazz.  One of the best kept secrets in jazz folklore, the Pittsburgh Jazz Legacy has heretofore remained mythical.  We have dubbed it “the greatest story never told” since it has not been represented in writing before now in such a way as to be accessible to anyone seeking to know more about it.  When it was happening, little did we know how priceless the memories would become when the times were gone.

 

Today jazz is still king in Pittsburgh, with events, performances and activities happening all the time. The Pittsburgh Jazz Network is dedicated to celebrating and showcasing the places, artists and fans that carry on the legacy of Pittsburgh's jazz heritage.

 

WELCOME!

 

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Duke Ellington is first African-American and the first musician to solo on U.S. circulating coin

    MARY LOU WILLIAMS     

            INTERVIEW

       In Her Own Words

Fats Domino dead at 89, medical examiner's office says


(CNN)Antoine "Fats" Domino, a titan of early rock 'n' roll whose piano-based hits -- such as "Ain't That a Shame," "Blueberry Hill" and "Blue Monday" -- influenced artists including Paul McCartney and Randy Newman, died Tuesday, an official said.

Domino passed away due to natural causes, according to Mark Bone, chief investigator with the Jefferson Parish Medical Examiner's office in Louisiana. He was 89.
With producer and arranger Dave Bartholomew, Domino cut a string of songs in the 1950s and early '60s that helped establish his hometown of New Orleans as a rock 'n' roll hotbed and made him one of the music's leading figures.
The pair recorded "The Fat Man" in late 1949, a song considered one of the first rock 'n' roll records -- a group that includes Wynonie Harris' version of "Good Rockin' Tonight" (1947) and Jackie Brenston and Ike Turner's "Rocket 88" (1951) -- and followed it up with more than 30 Top 40 hits, including 23 gold singles.
Pianist and singer-songwriter Fats Domino in a photo from 1967.
Starting in 1955, Domino was a regular on the national pop charts with songs that quickly became classics. Among the titles: "Ain't That a Shame" -- Domino's first crossover hit, which was watered down in a higher-charting version by Pat Boone -- "I'm Walkin'," "I'm Ready," "Valley of Tears," "I Want to Walk You Home" and "Walking to New Orleans." He sold more records than any 1950s figure except Elvis Presley, according to Rolling Stone.
His version of "Blueberry Hill," a song written in 1940, topped out at No. 2 on the Billboard charts and remains Domino's highest-charting record.
Most of his hits were characterized by midtempo rhythms and Domino's distinctive triplet-based piano style, in which he hammered chords in groups of three in rollicking, melodic fashion. The arrangements usually included a saxophone solo and a lead guitar line that echoed the melody.
The style was widely imitated. McCartney, a big Domino fan, wrote the Beatles song "Lady Madonna" in emulation of the pianist's work. (Domino returned the favor on his 1968 comeback album, "Fats Is Back," by covering the tune.) McCartney never grew out of his Domino fascination: Thirty years later, he did a version of the 1920s tune "Coquette" on his 1999 album "Run Devil Run" that was closely based on Domino's 1958 recording.
Newman, deeply influenced by New Orleans music in general, often seemed to channeling Domino's sound -- if not his smiling attitude -- in such songs as "Mama Told Me Not to Come" and "Back on My Feet Again."
"I was so influenced by Fats Domino that it's still hard for me to write a song that's not a New Orleans shuffle," Newman told The New York Times in 2008. He wrote the horn arrangements for "Fats Is Back."
Domino covered Newman, too, with a recording of "Have You Seen My Baby."
Domino's string of hits ended rather abruptly in the early '60s with a change of labels, from Imperial to ABC-Paramount. The latter forced him to record in Nashville, and the different atmosphere produced just one hit, a cover of the standard "Red Sails in the Sunset." But the good-natured Domino continued to tour and earn royalties, allowing him to live a comfortable lifestyle -- in New Orleans, of course, where his pink Cadillac could often be seen outside his Ninth Ward house.
When Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005, there was early concern that Domino, who had decided to stay in the Crescent City, had been killed by the storm. Someone even spray-painted "R.I.P. Fats -- You will be missed" on his house.
However, he and his family had been rescued by a Coast Guard helicopter. His estate wasn't as fortunate: "We lost everything," he said at the time.
Some of his belongings were replaced, including his gold records and a National Medal of Arts he'd been awarded in 1998 (from President Bill Clinton). His white Steinway was refurbished by the Louisiana Music Foundation, which put it on display in the French Quarter in 2013.
Domino remained a steadfast part of the New Orleans scene. He played a sold-out show at Tipitina's nightclub in 2007 and appeared in an episode of the TV show "Treme" in 2012.
Domino was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1986.

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