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AFRO-AMERICAN MUSIC INSTITUTE CELEBRATES 36 YEARS

BOYS CHOIR AFRICA SHIRTS
 
 
http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/building-today-for-tomorrow/x/267428

 Pain Relief Beyond Belief

                         http://www.komehsaessentials.com/                              

 

PITTSBURGH JAZZ

 

From Blakey to Brown, Como to Costa, Eckstine to Eldridge, Galbraith to Garner, Harris to Hines, Horne to Hyman, Jamal to Jefferson, Kelly to Klook; Mancini to Marmarosa, May to Mitchell, Negri to Nestico, Parlan to Ponder, Reed to Ruther, Strayhorn to Sullivan, Turk to Turrentine, Wade to Williams… the forthcoming publication Treasury of Pittsburgh Jazz Connections by Dr. Nelson Harrison and Dr. Ralph Proctor, Jr. will document the legacy of one of the world’s greatest jazz capitals.

 

Do you want to know who Dizzy Gillespie  idolized? Did you ever wonder who inspired Kenny Clarke and Art Blakey? Who was the pianist that mentored Monk, Bud Powell, Tad Dameron, Elmo Hope, Sarah Vaughan and Mel Torme? Who was Art Tatum’s idol and Nat Cole’s mentor? What musical quartet pioneered the concept adopted later by the Modern Jazz Quartet? Were you ever curious to know who taught saxophone to Stanley Turrentine or who taught piano to Ahmad Jamal? What community music school trained Robert McFerrin, Sr. for his history-making debut with the Metropolitan Opera? What virtually unknown pianist was a significant influence on young John Coltrane, Shirley Scott, McCoy Tyner, Bobby Timmons and Ray Bryant when he moved to Philadelphia from Pittsburgh in the 1940s?  Would you be surprised to know that Erroll Garner attended classes at the Julliard School of Music in New York and was at the top of his class in writing and arranging proficiency?

 

Some answers  can be gleaned from the postings on the Pittsburgh Jazz Network.

 

For almost 100 years the Pittsburgh region has been a metacenter of jazz originality that is second to no other in the history of jazz.  One of the best kept secrets in jazz folklore, the Pittsburgh Jazz Legacy has heretofore remained mythical.  We have dubbed it “the greatest story never told” since it has not been represented in writing before now in such a way as to be accessible to anyone seeking to know more about it.  When it was happening, little did we know how priceless the memories would become when the times were gone.

 

Today jazz is still king in Pittsburgh, with events, performances and activities happening all the time. The Pittsburgh Jazz Network is dedicated to celebrating and showcasing the places, artists and fans that carry on the legacy of Pittsburgh's jazz heritage.

 

WELCOME!

 

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Duke Ellington is first African-American and the first musician to solo on U.S. circulating coin

    MARY LOU WILLIAMS     

            INTERVIEW

       In Her Own Words

Our beloved Clark Terry has joined the big band in heaven where he’ll be singing and playing with the angels. He left us peacefully, surrounded by his family, students and friends. Clark has known and played with so many amazing people in his life. He has found great joy in his friendships and his greatest passion was spending time with his students. We will miss him every minute of every day, but he will live on through the beautiful music and positivity that he gave to the world. Clark will live in our hearts forever. With all my love, Gwen Terry If you would like to share your favorite stories about Clark, please do so in the Guestbook or on his Facebook page.

http://clarkterry.com/

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Obituary of Clark Terry as appeared in issue of Variety, by Christopher Morris, music reporter.
Trumpeter Clark Terry, who excelled as a leader and sideman in big bands and small combos during his seven-decade career in jazz, has died at 94.
Terry, a 2010 Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award honoree, entered hospice care on Feb. 13, suffering from the effects of advanced diabetes.
“He left us peacefully, surrounded by his family, students and friends,” his wife Gwen wrote on his Facebook page Saturday.
Among the most prolific and widely admired instrumentalists in jazz, Terry led or co-led more than 80 recording dates and played on more than 900 sessions by the time of his last session in 2004.
Also proficient on flugelhorn, Terry was best known to the general public as a longtime featured soloist in the house band of NBC’s “The Tonight Show.” In 1960, he became the first African-American staff musician with the network.
Born in St. Louis, Terry began playing in high school, and he played in the U.S. Navy band during World War II. After the war, he began his recording career with R&B saxophonist-singer Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson’s combo and saxophonist Charlie Barnet’s big band (alongside trumpeter Doc Severinsen, later the leader of the “Tonight Show” band).
During the late ’40s and through the ’50s, he held back-to-back gigs with the two most prestigious big bands in jazz: the Count Basie and Duke Ellington orchestras. (In 1959, he was part of the group that performed Ellington’s score for director Otto Preminger’s feature “Anatomy of a Murder.”)
Comfortable in both swing and bebop formats, he also worked during this period as a sideman with Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Dinah Washington, Stan Getz, Johnny Hodges, Gerald Wilson, Thelonious Monk, Billy Strayhorn, Sonny Rollins, Bud Powell and Ray Charles. He also worked in the big band of leader-composer-arranger Quincy Jones, for whom he served as an early mentor (as he did with another celebrated trumpeter, Miles Davis).
During the ’60s, he continued to record as a leader while doing sideman duty with Louis Armstrong, Charles Mingus, Johnny Griffin, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, Yusef Lateef, Dizzy Gillespie, Oliver Nelson, Wes Montgomery, J.J. Johnson, the Modern Jazz Quartet and Cannonball Adderley, among many others. He appeared on several albums toplined by “Tonight Show” bandleaders Severinsen and Skitch Henderson. He began a fruitful collaboration with trombonist Bob Brookmeyer’s big band in 1961.
In 1964, Terry – known for his sly humor and his trumpet-and-vocal conversations on the bandstand – actually scored something like a pop hit, when he scatted on his composition “Mumbles,” featured on “The Oscar Peterson Trio Plus One” (with Terry the titular “plus one”). The novel collaboration with Canadian pianist Peterson’s group propelled the album to No. 81 on the U.S. album chart.
From the ’70s onward, Terry continued to record but increasingly concentrated on touring, with Peterson and his own Big B-A-D Band. He began mounting his own branded jazz festivals in 2000.
He focused his energy on musical education in later years. A Harlem youth band he founded ultimately helped germinate New York’s celebrated “Jazz Mobile” program for youngsters. He also taught and lectured at a number of high schools, colleges and music camps.
A National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master, he – like Louis Armstrong and others before him – served as a Jazz Ambassador for the U.S. State Department, touring the Middle East and Africa.
Terry published his autobiography “Clark” in 2011. He was featured in the 2014 documentary “Keep on Keepin’ On,” about his relationship with a blind 23-year-old pianist.
Survivors include his wife.

Funeral For CLARK TERRY To be held at the Harlem historic Abyssinian Baptist Church


On Wednesday, February 25, 2015 3:29 PM, JazzCorner.com a href="mailto:lois@jazzcorner.com" class="parsedEmail" target="_blank">lois@jazzcorner.com> wrote:


 
FUNERAL FOR JAZZ LEGEND CLARK TERRY
To be held at the Harlem historic Abyssinian Baptist Church
The jazz world mourns the loss of Clark Terry, who passed away on February 21, 2015. We also celebrate the joy he brought to countless thousands of people whose lives he touched: through his music, his teaching, his joyous sense of humor, his kindness and his humility. He was an inspiration to us all.  Clark Terrys amazing music was a reflection of the amazing person that he was. He was an ambassador for Jazz, and an encouragement to countless musicians that came after him.
"I am honored and truly blessed to have known Clark Terry as a friend, and while I am not a musician, he was my mentor as well, since he taught me how to deal with life's challenges and life's gifts with humility, grace and always with love." -Lois Gilbert, JazzCorner.com
Funeral Services for Clark Terry
WHERE:
The Abyssinian Baptist Church
Officiated by Reverend Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III
132. Odell Clark Place 
(West 138th Street between Lenox Ave. & Adam Clayton Powell Blvd.)
New York, New York 10030
WHEN:
Saturday, February 28, 2015
10:00 a.m.
Media Crews should arrive by 9:30 AM for set-up
CONTACT:
Naomi Graham, 
Administrative/Media Officer, 
The Abyssinian Baptist Church 
(212) 862-7474 x255
Clark will be laid to rest at the Woodlawn Cemetery immediately following the service.  Funeral services entrusted to P.K. Miller Mortuary, Pine Bluff, Arkansas and George H. Weldon Funeral Home, New York City.  
In lieu of flowers: The family is asking that donations be made to the Jazz Foundation of America which has helped over the years to make sure that Clark's needs were met.  Please note when making donations online that they be noted "In Honor of Clark Terry"  http://jazzfoundation.org/memory_honor 
If you are donating by check, please send to Jazz Foundation of America 
Jazz Foundation of America
322 West 48th Street, 6th Floor
New York, NY 10036
For nearly half a century, Clark's greatest passion was helping to make young musicians' dreams come true.  He was a tremendous source of inspiration, of love, of respect, of decency, and of human rights.  He was one of the first recruits of the United States Navy when black musicians were given the Rating of Musician in 1942.  From being one of the few musicians who played as a featured soloist in both the Count Basie and the Duke Ellington Orchestras, to being the first black staff musician at NBC, Clark had multiple bands including big bands, youth bands and other ensembles.  He was one of the most recorded jazz musicians in history on more than 900 albums.

Clark's devotion towards mentoring young musicians influenced the lives of worldwide master talents such as Quincy Jones, Miles Davis, Marsalis and Dianne Reeves amongst countless others.  Clark inspired everyone by example.  As he was quoted in the documentary about his life and love for mentoring students, Keep On Keepin' On, "Your mind is a powerful asset.  Use it for positive thoughts and you'll learn what I've learned.  I call it getting on the plateau of positivity."

His many honors include NEA Jazz Master and the recipient of the Lifetime Grammy award. His beloved wife Gwen, has been by his side for the last 25 plus years.
For complete information on Clark Terry please visit http://clarkterry.com
If you are inclined, please share your memories on his guestbook. You can also post to his Facebook page


Lois Gilbert
Managing Director
JazzCorner.com
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Greatly enjoyed Mr. Terry's work with 
Oliver Nelson and Wes Montgomery along with many others. Rest in peace in the Arms of The Lord.

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