PROGRESSIVE MUSIC COMPANY

AFRO-AMERICAN MUSIC INSTITUTE CELEBRATES 36 YEARS

BOYS CHOIR AFRICA SHIRTS
 
 
http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/building-today-for-tomorrow/x/267428

 Pain Relief Beyond Belief

                         http://www.komehsaessentials.com/                              

 

PITTSBURGH JAZZ

 

From Blakey to Brown, Como to Costa, Eckstine to Eldridge, Galbraith to Garner, Harris to Hines, Horne to Hyman, Jamal to Jefferson, Kelly to Klook; Mancini to Marmarosa, May to Mitchell, Negri to Nestico, Parlan to Ponder, Reed to Ruther, Strayhorn to Sullivan, Turk to Turrentine, Wade to Williams… the forthcoming publication Treasury of Pittsburgh Jazz Connections by Dr. Nelson Harrison and Dr. Ralph Proctor, Jr. will document the legacy of one of the world’s greatest jazz capitals.

 

Do you want to know who Dizzy Gillespie  idolized? Did you ever wonder who inspired Kenny Clarke and Art Blakey? Who was the pianist that mentored Monk, Bud Powell, Tad Dameron, Elmo Hope, Sarah Vaughan and Mel Torme? Who was Art Tatum’s idol and Nat Cole’s mentor? What musical quartet pioneered the concept adopted later by the Modern Jazz Quartet? Were you ever curious to know who taught saxophone to Stanley Turrentine or who taught piano to Ahmad Jamal? What community music school trained Robert McFerrin, Sr. for his history-making debut with the Metropolitan Opera? What virtually unknown pianist was a significant influence on young John Coltrane, Shirley Scott, McCoy Tyner, Bobby Timmons and Ray Bryant when he moved to Philadelphia from Pittsburgh in the 1940s?  Would you be surprised to know that Erroll Garner attended classes at the Julliard School of Music in New York and was at the top of his class in writing and arranging proficiency?

 

Some answers  can be gleaned from the postings on the Pittsburgh Jazz Network.

 

For almost 100 years the Pittsburgh region has been a metacenter of jazz originality that is second to no other in the history of jazz.  One of the best kept secrets in jazz folklore, the Pittsburgh Jazz Legacy has heretofore remained mythical.  We have dubbed it “the greatest story never told” since it has not been represented in writing before now in such a way as to be accessible to anyone seeking to know more about it.  When it was happening, little did we know how priceless the memories would become when the times were gone.

 

Today jazz is still king in Pittsburgh, with events, performances and activities happening all the time. The Pittsburgh Jazz Network is dedicated to celebrating and showcasing the places, artists and fans that carry on the legacy of Pittsburgh's jazz heritage.

 

WELCOME!

 

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Duke Ellington is first African-American and the first musician to solo on U.S. circulating coin

    MARY LOU WILLIAMS     

            INTERVIEW

       In Her Own Words

Funeral Services for BUTCH WARREN October 15, 2013 - Washington DC's great bassist! 11:00AM WESTMINSTER CHURCH 400 I STREET SW DC

Event Details

Funeral Services for BUTCH WARREN October 15, 2013 - Washington DC's great basist! 11:00AM WESTMINSTER CHURCH 400 I STREET SW DC

Time: October 15, 2013 from 11am to 1pm
Location: WESTMINSTER CHURCH
Street: 400 I STREET SW
City/Town: WASHINGTON,DC
Website or Map: http://washingtondcjazznetwor…
Event Type: butch, warren, funeral, serices
Organized By: WASHINGTON DC JAZZ NETWORK
Latest Activity: 15 hours ago

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Event Description

PLEASE SUPPORT
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR BUTCH WARREN
TUESDAY,OCTOBER15,2013  WAKE 10:00AM    FUNERAL11:00AM
WESTMINSTER CHURCH 400 I STREET SW, WASHINGTON,DC
 
MEMORIAL JAM SESSION  SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20,2013  6:00PM TO 9:00PM
WESTMINSTER CHURCH  400 I STREET SW, WASHINGTON, DC
 
PLEASE SUPPORT AND LET EVERYONE KNOW. LET'S SEND A CHAMPION OUT WITH DIGNITY, LOVE, PRIDE, AND RESPECT FOR A GREAT CONTRIBUTION TO THE WORLD~~~Dick Smith

Edward Rudolph "Butch" Warren, a D.C. native who played as the "house bassist" for Blue Note Records in the late 1950s and early '60s and was recognized as a local jazz legend, died Saturday night of lung cancer at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring, MD. He was 74.

Warren, famously troubled for much of his life, was nonetheless an icon of jazz in the District. He was the reigning forefather of the D.C. bass sound. For several years he gigged regularly in D.C., weekly at the original Twins on Colorado Avenue NW and, more recently, at Columbia Station in Adams Morgan, where he played until 2010 as leader of the Butch Warren Experience (alongside his friend and quasi-caretaker, pianistPeter Edelman). His last years found him appearing on the bandstand much more sporadically, though usually with a hero's welcome; on August 9, he appeared at a celebratory concert for his own 74th birthday at Westminster Presbyterian Church in SW. It was his final public performance.

Born in Washington in 1939, Warren began playing bass professionally at age 14 with his father, the pianist Edward Warren. After attending D.C.'s Coolidge High School for one year, the younger Warren went to Harbison Junior College in South Carolina to study music, returning in 1959 in time to meet and play with celebrated trumpeter Kenny Dorham at Bohemian Caverns. Only 19, Warren followed the trumpeter back to New York and began gigging steadily with him; it was with Dorham that Warren entered the recording studio for the first time in January 1960.

Other important gigs followed, including with the hard bop quintet led byDonald Byrd and Pepper Adams. That date, which produced the 1961 albumRoyal Flush, began a long and fruitful collaboration with Blue Note Records, which deemed Warren the house bassist for its recordings of the period. In that capacity Warren performed several sessions with Jackie McLeanDexter Gordon, and, perhaps most importantly, the debut recording by Herbie HancockTakin' Off. In 1963 he joined the quartet of pianist Thelonious Monk, accompanying it on a world tour in early 1964. Read more here...

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