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AFRO-AMERICAN MUSIC INSTITUTE CELEBRATES 36 YEARS

BOYS CHOIR AFRICA SHIRTS
 
 
http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/building-today-for-tomorrow/x/267428

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PITTSBURGH JAZZ

 

From Blakey to Brown, Como to Costa, Eckstine to Eldridge, Galbraith to Garner, Harris to Hines, Horne to Hyman, Jamal to Jefferson, Kelly to Klook; Mancini to Marmarosa, May to Mitchell, Negri to Nestico, Parlan to Ponder, Reed to Ruther, Strayhorn to Sullivan, Turk to Turrentine, Wade to Williams… the forthcoming publication Treasury of Pittsburgh Jazz Connections by Dr. Nelson Harrison and Dr. Ralph Proctor, Jr. will document the legacy of one of the world’s greatest jazz capitals.

 

Do you want to know who Dizzy Gillespie  idolized? Did you ever wonder who inspired Kenny Clarke and Art Blakey? Who was the pianist that mentored Monk, Bud Powell, Tad Dameron, Elmo Hope, Sarah Vaughan and Mel Torme? Who was Art Tatum’s idol and Nat Cole’s mentor? What musical quartet pioneered the concept adopted later by the Modern Jazz Quartet? Were you ever curious to know who taught saxophone to Stanley Turrentine or who taught piano to Ahmad Jamal? What community music school trained Robert McFerrin, Sr. for his history-making debut with the Metropolitan Opera? What virtually unknown pianist was a significant influence on young John Coltrane, Shirley Scott, McCoy Tyner, Bobby Timmons and Ray Bryant when he moved to Philadelphia from Pittsburgh in the 1940s?  Would you be surprised to know that Erroll Garner attended classes at the Julliard School of Music in New York and was at the top of his class in writing and arranging proficiency?

 

Some answers  can be gleaned from the postings on the Pittsburgh Jazz Network.

 

For almost 100 years the Pittsburgh region has been a metacenter of jazz originality that is second to no other in the history of jazz.  One of the best kept secrets in jazz folklore, the Pittsburgh Jazz Legacy has heretofore remained mythical.  We have dubbed it “the greatest story never told” since it has not been represented in writing before now in such a way as to be accessible to anyone seeking to know more about it.  When it was happening, little did we know how priceless the memories would become when the times were gone.

 

Today jazz is still king in Pittsburgh, with events, performances and activities happening all the time. The Pittsburgh Jazz Network is dedicated to celebrating and showcasing the places, artists and fans that carry on the legacy of Pittsburgh's jazz heritage.

 

WELCOME!

 

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Duke Ellington is first African-American and the first musician to solo on U.S. circulating coin

    MARY LOU WILLIAMS     

            INTERVIEW

       In Her Own Words

Mothers of invention: the women who pioneered electronic music


Mothers of invention: the women who pioneered electronic music

A new festival celebrates Daphne Oram, Laurie Spiegel and other female synth wizards


Eliane Radigue, French electronic music composer


 French wave: Pop pioneer: Eliane Radigue. Photograph: Yves Arman

It’s not often, if at all, that you find a festival focusing on women in electronic music without making gender the star attraction. While “all-female bills” have gained traction to address the stark gender imbalance in dance and electronic music bookings, they can feel tokenist, where gender comes before talent. But not so at London’s Southbank Centre next weekend: its Deep Minimalism festival presents compositions by some of electronic music’s early frontrunners, going as far back as the 1950s. They just so happen to be almost exclusively female.

Many of these composers get less time in the spotlight than their male counterparts, who dominate the so-called electronic music canon (the only one present here is John Cage). But they were just as responsible for shaping the future of the genre.



One such figurehead was Daphne Oram, who noodled with modular machines at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop in its early days, before the studio created the seminal Doctor Who theme. Still Point, her 1950 piece that combines pre-taped sounds played from 78 rpm discs with a live orchestra, will be performed for the first time ever on Friday by turntable manipulator Shiva Feshareki and the London Contemporary Orchestra.

Other pieces to appear at the festival come from Laurie Spiegel and Eliane Radigue, her sometime studio mate in the 1970s. The former programmed synths before computer-based controllers were a twinkle in a techno DJ’s eye, and you’ll be able to hear a collection of her works next Saturday. French composer Radigue, meanwhile, was an early convert to the ARP 2500 synth (the same one used to communicate with the aliens in the film Close Encounters Of The Third Kind). She also brought Buddhism into modular synthesis, creating a heavy, lush drone, as in her 11th-century-Tibet-inspired piece Jetsun Mila.



Notably, Pauline Oliveros is a constant presence throughout the three-dayer. In particular, she’ll be holding a workshop on “deep listening”, a mindfulness-style way of hearing music she developed in the 80s and a concept that’s percolated through to the festival’s name. This experience, of meditative music that slowly unfurls and allows time to think, is truly what Deep Minimalism is all about. No less significant however is the final performance of Dawn (for multiple singers) by experimental vocalist Meredith Monk, whose influence can be heard in contemporary artists from Holly Herndon to Laura Cannell. It’s a fitting end to a festival that – in the way that it has tackled the gender issue – feels like an awakening.

Deep Minimalism, St John’s Smith square, SW1, 24-26 June

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