PROGRESSIVE MUSIC COMPANY

AFRO-AMERICAN MUSIC INSTITUTE CELEBRATES 36 YEARS

BOYS CHOIR AFRICA SHIRTS
 
 
http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/building-today-for-tomorrow/x/267428

 Pain Relief Beyond Belief

                         http://www.komehsaessentials.com/                              

 

PITTSBURGH JAZZ

 

From Blakey to Brown, Como to Costa, Eckstine to Eldridge, Galbraith to Garner, Harris to Hines, Horne to Hyman, Jamal to Jefferson, Kelly to Klook; Mancini to Marmarosa, May to Mitchell, Negri to Nestico, Parlan to Ponder, Reed to Ruther, Strayhorn to Sullivan, Turk to Turrentine, Wade to Williams… the forthcoming publication Treasury of Pittsburgh Jazz Connections by Dr. Nelson Harrison and Dr. Ralph Proctor, Jr. will document the legacy of one of the world’s greatest jazz capitals.

 

Do you want to know who Dizzy Gillespie  idolized? Did you ever wonder who inspired Kenny Clarke and Art Blakey? Who was the pianist that mentored Monk, Bud Powell, Tad Dameron, Elmo Hope, Sarah Vaughan and Mel Torme? Who was Art Tatum’s idol and Nat Cole’s mentor? What musical quartet pioneered the concept adopted later by the Modern Jazz Quartet? Were you ever curious to know who taught saxophone to Stanley Turrentine or who taught piano to Ahmad Jamal? What community music school trained Robert McFerrin, Sr. for his history-making debut with the Metropolitan Opera? What virtually unknown pianist was a significant influence on young John Coltrane, Shirley Scott, McCoy Tyner, Bobby Timmons and Ray Bryant when he moved to Philadelphia from Pittsburgh in the 1940s?  Would you be surprised to know that Erroll Garner attended classes at the Julliard School of Music in New York and was at the top of his class in writing and arranging proficiency?

 

Some answers  can be gleaned from the postings on the Pittsburgh Jazz Network.

 

For almost 100 years the Pittsburgh region has been a metacenter of jazz originality that is second to no other in the history of jazz.  One of the best kept secrets in jazz folklore, the Pittsburgh Jazz Legacy has heretofore remained mythical.  We have dubbed it “the greatest story never told” since it has not been represented in writing before now in such a way as to be accessible to anyone seeking to know more about it.  When it was happening, little did we know how priceless the memories would become when the times were gone.

 

Today jazz is still king in Pittsburgh, with events, performances and activities happening all the time. The Pittsburgh Jazz Network is dedicated to celebrating and showcasing the places, artists and fans that carry on the legacy of Pittsburgh's jazz heritage.

 

WELCOME!

 

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Duke Ellington is first African-American and the first musician to solo on U.S. circulating coin

    MARY LOU WILLIAMS     

            INTERVIEW

       In Her Own Words

Pittsburgh jazz legend Earl 'Fatha' Hines to receive historical marker in Duques

Pittsburgh jazz legend Earl 'Fatha' Hines to receive historical marker in Duquesne

Patrick Varine
   
3772555_web1_ptr-hines1-042321
WILLIAM P. GOTTLIEB/IRA AND LEONORE S. GERSHWIN FUND COLLECTION, MUSIC DIVISION, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Earl "Fatha" Hines, considered by many to be the father of modern jazz piano, was born in Duquesne, Pa., in 1903. He will receive a historical marker from the Pennsylvania Historical & Museums Commission.
3772555_web1_ptr-hines2-042321
WILLIAM P. GOTTLIEB/IRA AND LEONORE S. GERSHWIN FUND COLLECTION, MUSIC DIVISION, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Earl "Fatha" Hines, considered by many to be the father of modern jazz piano, was born in Duquesne, Pa., in 1903. He will receive a historical marker from the Pennsylvania Historical & Museums Commission.
3772555_web1_ptr-hines3-042321
WILLIAM P. GOTTLIEB/IRA AND LEONORE S. GERSHWIN FUND COLLECTION, MUSIC DIVISION, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Earl "Fatha" Hines, considered by many to be the father of modern jazz piano, was born in Duquesne, Pa., in 1903. He will receive a historical marker from the Pennsylvania Historical & Museums Commission.

TELLING HIS STORY
Here is the text that will go on the recognizable blue-and-yellow historical markers that dot Pennsylvania's history rich landscape:
"Revolutionary jazz pianist who got his start in Pittsburgh. While there he became the first African American on a radio broadcast. He influenced many other jazz greats, and his band launched the careers of Billy Eckstein, Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Nat King Cole and others. He was inducted into the Big Band and Jazz Hall of Fame in 1980."


James Johnson, who runs the Afro-American Institute of Music in Pittsburgh’s Homewood neighborhood, said it would be tough for any jazz piano player to go through life without being influenced — consciously or not — by the legacy of Earl “Fatha” Hines.

Born in 1903 in Duquesne, Earl Kenneth Hines went on to become one of the most influential jazz pianists of the genre.

He will be formally recognized by the Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission with a historical marker in his hometown.

“It would be tough to get around him, period, as a piano player,” Johnson said. “Piano was a lot more of the ragtime type of tradition when he started. Earl was with Louis Armstrong for a long time in Chicago, and eventually he began imitating trumpet lines on the piano.”

“He’s one of the original jazz legends from Pittsburgh,” said Nelson Harrison, a Pittsburgh native, jazz musician, composer and clinical psychologist. “Every time a Pittsburgher hit the scene, their particular style formed a whole new approach to the music. And their dependents became very famous.”

Harrison said Hines’ signature piano style was forged during his time with Armstrong.

“He was playing with the strongest trumpet player of the day,” Harrison said. “And he would say, ‘They need to hear my notes, too,’ so he would play ‘trumpet-style’ piano using octaves, so he could be heard better.”

Harrison got a chance to perform with Hines in 1975, when he played a weeklong engagement at Heinz Hall with Billy Eckstine’s orchestra.

Harrison said Hines is “essentially the father of the modern school of jazz piano.”

“Nobody disputes that the greatest jazz pianist of all time was Art Tatum,” Harrison said. “But his idol was ‘Fatha’ Hines.”

Below, hear Hines’s distinctive piano style during a solo performance at the 1974 Montreux Jazz Festival:

Hines’s bands in the 1940s helped launch the careers of jazz mainstays like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, and he worked extensively with other Pittsburgh jazz luminaries like Billy Eckstine and Billy Strayhorn.

Jazz legend Duke Ellington once said that “the seeds of bop were in Earl Hines’s piano style.” Hines even fronted Ellington’s orchestra briefly, when Ellington became ill in 1944.

Marva Josie of Clairton was Hines’s lead singer between the 1960s and ’70s. During their time sharing the stage, they performed for two U.S. presidents.

“He deserves it,” Josie said of the historical marker. “I was on the road with him for 16 years and he overwhelmed people, playing every night. He was just a very happy person.”

Josie said she was immediately drawn to Hines’s creativity.

“I wasn’t his age, but I’d heard so many other musicians talk about his approach to playing,” she said. “The way he was playing taught me how to ‘sing through’ the rest of the band. He gave us a chance to be creative on the spot, and it was wonderful. A lot of times when you work with musicians, that doesn’t happen.”

In Gillespie’s book, “To Be or Not to Bop,” he encapsulates Hines’s massive influence extremely well.

“He changed the style of the piano,” Gillespie wrote. “You can find the roots of Bud Powell, Herbie Hancock, all the guys who came after that. If it hadn’t been for Earl Hines blazing the path for the next generation to come, it’s no telling where or how they would be playing now. There were individual variations but the style of … the modern piano came from Earl Hines.”

Patrick Varine is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Patrick at 724-850-2862, pvarine@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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